Close

Navigation

Online Course Schedule

Generally, NNU Online students will take two classes every 8 weeks. Class schedules allow for an emphasis in liberal studies or business, meaning that students have some choice as to which two classes they take simultaneously. NNU Online is an option for those wishing to enroll in the program part-time or to take classes a la carte. See the NNU Online Liberal Studies Course Catalog for the full list of courses. Note: The schedule below is not comprehensive.

Introduction

  • HUMN1050 Introduction to Online Learning (1 credit): A course designed to help students learn the skills necessary for successful completion of online college-level work. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the demands of online learning, utilizing the university’s learning management system, and development of strategies to effectively engage with instructor and peers online.

Fall (Session 1)

  • COMM1210 Intro to Public Speaking (3 credits): An introduction to verbal communication in groups, listening, and public speaking. Emphasis will be placed on speaking, delivery issues, speech construction, audience connection, and the communication process.
  • ENGL2410W Major Literature of the Western World (3 credits): An introductory study of major literary works drawn from the European, British, and American traditions. Special emphasis is placed on literary appreciation. This course fulfills the general-education "W" requirement. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL1030 with a grade of C- or better, or an ACT English score of 30 or higher.
  • HUMN1010 Cornerstone (3 credits): This course is intended to help students develop a life-long passion for learning. They will explore the habits of mind of various academic disciplines and discover differing perspectives on the pursuit of knowledge as well as their commonalities and connectedness. Students will be introduced to the four University outcomes, develop skills necessary for a successful college experience, and begin collecting a portfolio to document their learning and track their personal, spiritual, and academic growth throughout their college career.
  • MATH0900 Essential Mathematics (3 credits) (IF NEEDED): Whole numbers, fractions and mixed numbers, decimals, ratio, proportion, percent, measurement, geometry, introduction of algebra, solving equations, and statistics. This is a credit/no credit course. Receiving credit for this course prepares the student to take MATH1100 or MATH2240. Credit for courses numbered below 1000 is not transferable.
  • MUSC1010 A Survey of Art and Music (3 credits): An introduction to the stylistic characteristics and cultural climate of the important artistic epochs in history, and includes both the western and the non-western traditions. 

Fall (Session 2)

  • BIOL1060 Human Biology (3 credits): Selected topics related to the human body with particular emphasis on the integration of form and function as well as genetics and ethics. This course does not apply toward major requirements in biology.
  • BIOL1060L Human Biology Laboratory (1 credit) A laboratory study using selected topics relating to the human body, which is intended to be taught in connection with BIOL1060. This course does not apply toward major requirements in biology. Corequisites: BIOL1060 Fees: Additional fee required.
  • BSNS2330 Business for Math and Finance (3 credits): An introductory course to statistical theory and applications for business decision-making purposes. Topics include the role and use of statistics, tables and graphs, data analysis, probability distributions, descriptive measures, and statistical inference, including sampling, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, analysis of variance, quality control, and regression analysis. Fulfills the General Education Mathematics Competency requirement.
  • COMM1210 Intro to Public Speaking (3 credits): An introduction to verbal communication in groups, listening, and public speaking. Emphasis will be placed on speaking, delivery issues, speech construction, audience connection, and the communication process.
  • ENGL0900 Improvement of Language Use (3 credits) (IF NEEDED): A course for students who are not prepared for college-level composition, emphasizing a systematic study of language usage, spelling and writing. (Does not satisfy the catalog specific course requirement for English Composition.)
  • MATH1100 Liberal Arts Mathematics (3 credits): Students will explore mathematical ideas and logical reasoning. This class will look at mathematical applications in life which may include topics such as statistics, fair voting schemes, prime numbers, and modular arithmetic. Students will also develop their own insights and theorems through the exploration of mathematical patterns. The content of the class may vary each semester. The course is designed for non-science majors. The course satisfies the general education mathematics competency requirement. Prerequisites: ACT score of 21 or equivalency on the COMPASS Exam.
  • MUSC1010 A Survey of Art and Music (3 credits): An introduction to the stylistic characteristics and cultural climate of the important artistic epochs in history, and includes both the western and the non-western traditions.

Spring (Session 1)

  • BIOL1040 Environmental Science (3 credits): A study of the issues pertaining to environmental sustainability including topics such as population growth, energy, pollution, and conserving biodiversity. A central theme is Christian Stewardship.
  • BSNS2170 Computer Applications in Business (3 credits): Introduction to computers as a tool for business including fundamental concepts of information technology and the use of business application software including word processing, spreadsheets, database, graphics, electronic communications, and World Wide Web. Prerequisites: Computer proficiency or instructor's permission.
  • ENGL1030 University Writing and Research (3 credits): A course which enables students to sharpen analytical reading skills and, through the medium of research projects, to refine existing critical thinking and writing skills, preparing them for rigorous academic writing. It acquaints students with current information technology, library resources, and undergraduate research methods, covering the entire process of researching and writing persuasive essays. A student must earn a grade of C- or better. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL0900, or ACT English score of 20 or higher, or Compass English score of 83 or higher, or passing of the NNU English Department Writing Evaluation, or advanced placement.
  • ENGL3015 Topics in Writing and Literature (3 credits): Building on the analytical, research, and writing skills gained in ENGL1030, this course provides students the opportunity to explore further the relationships between one particular field of study, academic discipline, or topic and to write critically, engagingly, and knowledgeably about related topics to an informed audience. A student must earn a grade of C- or better. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL1030 with a grade of C- or better, or an ACT English score of 30 or higher.
  • PSYC1550 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits): A study of the basic principles of human behavior, giving attention to developmental patterns, motivation and adjustment, learning and memory processes, and individual differences in aptitude, personality, and mental health.

Spring (Session 2)

  • PHIL2020 Ethics (3 credits): An introduction to the concept of good, involving a study of the major ethical theories of the West and their applications to contemporary moral problems.
  • BIBL1100 Intro to Biblical Studies (3 credits): An introduction to the serious study of the Bible in its historical, cultural, and literary context. The course emphasizes the essential content, structure, and theological message of the books of the Bible. Students are introduced to the practice of biblical exegesis and to the geography and archaeology of the lands of the Bible. This course is designed for general students. Prerequisites or Corequisites: HUMN1010, ENGL1030.
  • SOGY1550 Introduction to Sociology (3 credits): An introduction to the sociological perspective and to basic theories and procedures for studying society, with an emphasis on understanding the fundamental nature of social relationships, structures, and processes.

Summer

  • KINE1000 Fundamentals of Wellness (1 credit): An approach to health and physical education relating the value of physical activity to the human body. The content of the course will be presented by utilizing lecture and laboratory sessions. The course emphasizes the "holistic" wellness approach to the individual regarding the dimensions of wellness. Corequisite: KINE1000L. Fee: Additional fee required.
  • KINE1000L Fundamentals of Wellness Laboratory (0 credits): Course designed to allow students to assess personal health benchmarks as related to overall wellness including: body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, endurance and flexibility, skill related fitness, and blood lipids analysis. Students will develop a personal wellness program based on personal health assessments. Corequisite: KINE1000.
  • KINE1020 Heart Healthy Activities (1 credit): Wellness activities of adult fitness, aerobic fitness, cycling, life guarding, physical fitness, yoga, Pilates, Taekwondo, skiing and derivatives offered, swimming (intermediate), jogging/walking, and water fitness. Two activities per semester. This course fulfills one general education KINE activity requirement. May be repeated for elective credit but not for general education credit. Fee: Additional fee may be required.
  • SOGY1015 Exploring Cultural Anthropology (3 credits): This course is designed to provide both a conceptual framework for and personal experience in identifying cultural differences and valuing/validating those differences in everyday life of adult students. Fulfills a General Education Level II Cross-Cultural Experience if taken with SOGY1015CC Intercultural Lab 2.
  • SOGY1015CL Intercultural Lab - Tier 2 (0 credits): This lab is a co-requirement with Tier II cross-cultural courses and stand-alone experiences for the General Education Cross Cultural Requirement. In order to fulfill general-education requirements for an approved Tier II course or stand-alone experience, students must enroll in the intercultural lab. In the lab, students will complete the cross-cultural seminar and various self-reflection exercises related to their cross-cultural experience.